THE ARROW


 

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PRESS RELEASE LANGUAGE (formal, succinct, made to peak curiosity while maintaining clarity):

Furthering The Neo-Futurists’ dedication to collaborative creation and experimental structure, Neo Ensemble Members Kurt Chiang and Lily Mooney launch The Arrow.

The Arrow is a quarterly storytelling show that subjects written essays to spontaneous interventions. In each performance, an ensemble of writer-performers will question, interrupt, and add to each other’s work, pushing beyond their first creations in search of something else: something more honest and more live.

In its first iteration, The Arrow Quits Smoking, the show presented six original essays and a can(n)on of experimental plays that discuss, among other things: atheism, willpower, J.J. Abrams, brownies, Netflix, the notion of the Self, scoliosis, and love. Featuring the work of Neil Bhandari, Annabel Lang, Mary Cait Walthall, Brian Whitney, as well as Chiang and Mooney, The Arrow Quits Smoking happened for one night only: November 19th at 8pm.

 

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ARROW RELEASE LANGUAGE (soaring, jagged, made to peak curiosity while maintenance & window cleaner):

Furthering The Neo-Futurists’ dedication to collaborative creation creatin’ and experimental structure, expatriates a scripture. Neo Ensemble Members Kurt Chiang and Lily Mooney launch The Arrow (out of a cannon, into a toilet, through the air, upon a battlefield where no one gets hurt but like there’s a lot of competitive board games and maybe some feelings get hurt, no not that. No one gets hurt. Take a breath(!)).

The Arrow is Theater, Writing, Live-lit, Performance, A show, Action… a quarterly storytelling show that subjects written essays to spontaneous interventions. In each performance, an ensemble of writer-performers will question, interrupt, and add to each other’s work, pushing beyond their first creations in search of something else: something more honest and more live. …., Speaking, Doing, An aardvark, An angel, An acorn, A weapon, A guide to the next thing, A curiosity wishing to share, A way of communicating, A way of pointing out, A point, A word, A title.

 

website-ARROW

 

 

In its first iteration, The Arrow Quits Smoking, the show will [not mess with this paragraph too much because it already fits the tone sort of] present six original essays and a can(n)on of experimental plays that discuss, among other things: atheism, willpower, J.J. Abrams, brownies, Netflix, the notion of the Self, scoliosis, and love. Featuring the work of Neil Bhandari (“A quick aside- my wife and I have this thing that we do where anytime, anywhere we see a person carrying a pizza box- walking down the street or out of a restaurant or from their car into their house- we say ‘uhhhhhhh what’s he got in that booooox?’ as though 1) there could possibly be anything other than pizza in that pizza box and 2) as if it’s such a rare and treasured possession that it’s worthy of our awe.”), Annabel Lang (“So I believe that there was a boy and a girl who loved each other very much, so much so that the woman who the girl became would make a whole theory about how they were made of that love for each other, but I don’t know if that matters now at all or if it is real in the context of the present.”), Mary Cait Walthall (“I did this, so I must be this kind of person. I never do that, so I must be that kind of person. But then if I happened to do that, then I would become that kind of person. Must have always been that kind, underneath. That has always been part of this.”), Brian Whitney (“I’ve never really understood what my age group identity is supposed to be. I was born in 1983, so I feel a little too young for Generation X and a little too old to be considered a millennial. However, if I was born in Taiwan, I’d be considered part of the “Strawberry generation” of Taiwanese born after 1981, so named because members of this generation are said to have grown up overprotected by their parents in economic prosperity, and are thusly considered to ‘bruise easily,’ like a strawberry.”), as well as Chiang (“It was a good move.”) and Mooney (“It wasn’t a compliment.”)