Neo-Access


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WHAT IS IT?

In the 2015-2016 season, we partnered with Victory Gardens Theater’s Access Project and Alternatives, Inc. by launching Neo-Access, an ongoing initiative committed to make our work more physically, geographically, and culturally accessible. In the past year we’ve engaged with the following programs:

Scholarships for Artists of Color [Next Cycle Begins in February]

♦ Too Much Light at Victory Gardens – The Access Project

Urban Arts program at Alternatives, Inc

 

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◊ SCHOLARSHIPS FOR ARTISTS OF COLOR

We know that artists of color are under represented on our stage and throughout Chicago theater. In an effort to support a diversity of artistic voices, the Neo-Futurists offer scholarships for artists of color to take a class with us free of charge. The next application cycle opens in February.

◊ THE ACCESS PROJECT AT VICTORY GARDENS

The Access Project at Victory Gardens is “a nationally recognized model outreach effort designed to involve people with disabilities in all aspects of theater, both on and off the stage.” We’re proud to have been a part of it in 2016.

Find out more HERE.

◊ ALTERNATIVES PARTNERSHIP

Alternatives, Inc. is a community development agency in Uptown. This past year, we provided teaching artists for their Urban Arts program and they’ve started training our artists in restorative justice through positive creative expression & exchange.

Get involved HERE. 

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DONATE TO SUPPORT NEO-ACCESS HERE

Soon after we began these projects, we realized that Neo-Access should extend beyond what was planned for 2015-2016. We’re still seeking opportunities to include a multiplicity of voices on our stage and share our work more broadly. If you are an individual with feedback on the goals and efficacy of Neo-Access or if you are an organization interested in partnering with Neo-Access, please email us at admin@neofuturists.org

Neo-Access is supported in part by grants from Alphawood Foundation Chicago and The Chicago Community Trust.

[PHOTO CRED: Joe Mazza of Brave Lux Photography at Don Nash Community Center.]